Pros and Cons of Homeschooling

Pros of Homeschooling:

  • Parental control of what kids are taught and how it’s taught.
  • Get to teach your value system to your kids, not the government’s “values”.
  • You can teach to your kid’s learning style. There are no learning disabled kids, just teacher disabled adults.
  • If you want to spend all day learning about how caterpillars become butterflys or how to conjugate verbs you can.
  • Better socialization skills (home-school kids being un-socialized is one of the great lies). Our kids interact with kids and adults of all ages, not just with kids their own age. This is of particular importance for boys.
  • Lots of time and freedom to pursue other activities. Homeschooling allows them to do much more if the parent so chooses.
  • Takes about 1/3 of the time of regular schooling. My kids, if motivated, are done school in 2-3 hours tops. The lazy ones can take all day.
  • Can do school in your pajamas.
  • Don’t have to get up super early to meet a carpool or the bus.
  • Lots of time to play outside and just be a kid.
  • No getting dropped of at 7am for before-school care and picked up at 6pm from after-care.
  • Lots of one on one time with parents. Builds better relationships with parents and siblings.
  • No busywork and filler in the classroom.
  • Kids learn at their pace not at the pace of the slowest kid in the classroom
  • Costs are very low, much lower than private school and about the same as public school. We spend less than $200 to school our k-8 kids (high-school homeschooling costs more and will be covered in a future post). This assumes you aren’t using some expensive curriculum package. My bride does up her own curriculum. But even the packaged curriculum is affordable for most.
  • Safer – we have had no bomb threats, school shootings, stabbings, drug use, bullying…well ok, my kids do bully each other. But we prefer to call it “Life Lessons”.
  • You can take vacation whenever you want. We get to go to the beach when it’s the off-season. Beaches aren’t crowded and the rents are a lot cheaper.
  • You are there to help you kids through the “big issues” in life and can decide when they learn about them.
  • The person who loves the child most in this world is also their teacher.

Cons of Homeschooling:

None. Well none for us. I hear other people comment on the downside of homeschooling but this has always been from people who have never tried it. I have no time or patience to deal with these objections and people any more. We’ve been doing this for over 20 years and have heard it all. If you have problems with the idea of homeschooling try sitting down with a veteran home-school mom (like my bride) and talking about it. We have dealt with all the objections over the years. Or better yet give homeschooling a try. You can always ship them back to the public school, they would love to get their meat-hooks back into them.

Results so far – My oldest graduated college 2 years early and got her masters in a year. 2nd oldest graduated and his working. 3rd just finished Grad school with a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree and has started work. 4th has graduated and been working for a year. The 5th finished undergrad and is heading to Grad school in a few months. The next 2 kids are in college currently. All of our kids have finished high school either 1 or 2 years early. 2 kids are doing high school currently. 1 is middleschool age. 3 are elementary school age.

Too Much Information?

How much is too much when sharing on the internet? How much do we really need to be sharing with each other compared to what we share with those in real life?

Do you need to know tons of details about those that contribute to this website? If you don’t, does it make what we post less trustworthy and relevant to you? How much personal information is safe to share from the author’s perspective?

People reading articles on the internet, especially on new sites like this one, have no way of knowing if what write is true or fabricated. I could be a single, 15 year-old kid making up stuff to jerk around with people. As opposed to the 50-something father of many that I am (honest).

And assuming you do take us at our word, how many personal details do you need to know in order for us to get our ideas across? At least some details are needed to give credence to what we are writing about.

It’s easy to say “spend less than you make” and “save more”. But without practical examples that have worked for us, will these saying help you at all? Probably not.

I’m a runner, I probably run too much. But if someone asks me how to train for a marathon. And I say “go run”. That’s particularly useful. It’s true, but some more details and personal experience would make the advice a lot more useful. But you wouldn’t need every detail about my running life. Sharing stories about chaffing and and toenails falling off, while amusing to some, wouldn’t contribute much to your running goals.

So we will try to balance over-sharing vs leaving out any personal information at all. You might get posts with some details of our financial status, marriage and child rearing tips (if we can think of any good ones), homeschooling how-to’s and personal data on other topics of interest.

So rest assured, you won’t ever know if/what underwear we are wearing. But you will know what works for our family and some of the basic details.

Pros and Cons of Being Debt Free

Being debt free is great for your finances and it’s also a great feeling. This may be even more important for larger families who have less wiggle-room in their finances. Not having to worry about debt and having an emergency fund set up goes a long way to giving you financial peace of mind. When life happens (car breaks down, medical emergency, appliance dies) it’s less stressful to deal with when you have the funds to cover it and don’t have to borrow to handle it.

On a personal level, this is our debt situation:

  • Credit card, car loan, and all other debt (except Mortgage) – Debt Free since 1988.
  • Mortgage – Debt Free since 2012

Pros:

  • You will sleep much better at night.
  • Your marriage will improve; the #1 reason given for divorce in the U.S. is money arguments.
  • You can take advantage of good deals or investments that arise. Chicken breasts on sale for $1.69lb? You’ve got the funds to buy a few hundred pounds if you want.
  •  More freedom to move or change jobs if you want/need to.
  • Graduating with no student loans will enable you to start saving sooner and investing in your future.
  •  You are not paying interest to The Man on stuff that you probably can’t even remember purchasing.
  •  You will be able to establish an emergency fund and start saving for retirement, vacation, new home or car etc…
  • You will be able to help others more easily, Donate to your church, favorite charity etc.

Cons:

  • Since you will be sleeping better you won’t be able to watch all those late-night infomercials.  How will you know which new product will be the next Pillow-Pet or Snuggy?
  • With no money problems, you will have to find something else to fight with your spouse about…maybe he/she squeezes the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • You will no longer get to keep eating non-sale $5.99lb chicken.
  • You won’t have an excuse to keep living in that house you are upside-down in and keep working in that sucky job you hate.
  • Since you didn’t borrow for college, you won’t get to pay back $50,000 in loans over the next 20 years.
  • You won’t get to pay 18% to Visa and MasterCard for those carbon-fiber golf clubs that are gathering dust in your garage, sitting next to a financed sports car.
  • You will have to find your excitement elsewhere since you will be missing out on the excitement of living paycheck to paycheck and being on the financial edge.
  • You will have to say yes when someone knocks on your door collecting for the Association to End Cat Juggling

 

Teaching Kids About Money

Topics to discuss with kids:

  • Saving vs spending. You have a limited amount of money. You can’t spend all of it. You need to save some of it, at least 10%.
  • Delayed gratification. “You can’t always get what you want” Jagger/Richards. They need to learn patience and how to save up for something they want to purchase.
  • Savings – get them a piggy-bank or an old jar to save money in. Open a savings account and teach them about interest.
  • We don’t do allowances, they get fed. But consider allowances, and use them as a way to teach them to work for money and what to do with the money they make.
  • Teach them to give of their money and time. Have your kids give away some of their own money.
  • Be careful using credit cards around them. They will think that whipping out a card is all you have to do to buy things.
  • Teach them about credit cards. Make sure they know not to use them unless they have the money to pay them off in full each month. That they will have to pay interest (a lot of interest) if they carry a balance.
  • Teach them that it’s better to use cash or debit cards for purchases.
  • Teach them how to shop (take them to the grocery store). I know shopping with kids can be more painful than watching a Miley Cyrus video, but take them with and teach them how to comparison shop and how to stick to a list of items that you need. This will also teach them some math skills. Have them hand the money to the cashier, not a credit card, and make sure they get the correct change.
  • Teach them how to balance a checkbook.
  • Teach them how to make a budget. And why one is important.
  • Teach them to protect their financial and personal, data. Be careful who has your SSN and account info. Be careful shopping online.
  • Teach them about legalized thievery. Taxes.
  • Explain how loans work: mortgages, cars, student loans.